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"Columbia University's African American and African Diaspora Studies Department is uniquely positioned to pursue a research program on the cutting edge of scholarly and policy debates."

−Farah Jasmine Griffin, Chair, African American and African Diaspora Studies Department 

Photo portrait of a woman sitting in front of her library in her office

VIDEOS

Woman sitting at her desk on her computer with shelves of books behind her
Mabel Wilson on Architecture and Race

Professor Wilson speaks about how she views architecture through the prism of race and race relations in the United States.

Text saying African American & African Diaspora Studies Department
African American and African Diaspora Studies Department

This video explores the history of African American and African Diaspora Studies at Columbia and the significance of becoming a department.

Man with glasses teaching in front of a class of students
Frank Guridy on New York City and Black Culture

Professor Frank Guridy explains the significance of Columbia being on the border of Harlem and the location's influence on his work on black history.

Selected Publications

A boy nad girl stand idly by while a well-dressed woman walks up the steps into a mobile trailer; a banner hung from the side of the trailer reads: International Afro-American Museum, Entrance

Negro Building: Black Americans in the World of Fairs and Museums

Mabel O. Wilson
An image of black mena dn women waiting in line to be evaluated by a physician is ghosted over an X-ray of a pair of lungs; the words "infectious fear" appear at the top

Infectious Fear: politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation

Samuel K. Roberts
Book jacket featuring a white background with the words "South of Pico" in gold lettering

South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s

Kellie Jones
The words "The Practice of Diaspora:  Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism" overlay an image of silhouetted figures in a cityscape

The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism

Brent Hayes Edwards